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Table 2 Summary of psychophysics of temperature thresholds necessary to produce ratings at each condition

From: Sex differences in psychophysical and neurophysiological responses to pain in older adults: a cross-sectional study

Variables Min Max Median IQR p valuea Effect sizeb
Temperature       
 Warmth Males 31 38 33.0 32.0–33.0 0.186 0.41
Females 31 35 32.0 32.0–32.8
 Mild pain Males 34 47 38.5 35.0–44.0 0.002 0.92
Females 33 39 35.0 34.0–36.0
 Moderate pain Males 37 48 44.0 40.3–47.3 0.007 0.99
Females 36 46 38.0 38.0–41.8
 Mild pain > warmthc Males 1.0 15.0 5.0 3.0–10.3 0.037 0.84
Females 1.0 6.0 2.5 2.0–4.5
 Moderate pain > warmthc Males 5.0 17.0 11.5 7.0–12.0 0.081 0.30
Females 3.0 13.0 6.0 5.2–10.0
Unpleasantness       
 Warmth Males 0.0 8.0 0.5 0.0–2.7 0.379 0.30
Females 0.0 4.5 0.0 0.0–2.2
 Mild pain Males 0.0 16.0 3.8 0.1–7.3 0.428 0.25
Females 0.0 5.0 3.5 0.0–5.0
 Moderate pain Males 2.5 19.0 7.0 5.0–11.8 0.028 0.72
Females 0.0 9.0 5.0 3.1–7.8
 Mild pain > warmthd Males −8.0 16.0 3.0 0.1–4.0 0.431 0.76
Females 0.0 5.0 1.5 0.0–3.0
 Moderate pain > mild paind Males −3.0 19.0 6.3 5.0–9.0 0.051 0.78
Females 0.0 9.0 4.3 2.7–5.0
  1. Summary of psychophysics of temperature thresholds necessary to produce warmth, mild pain, or moderate pain, and unpleasantness ratings at each condition (age/matched N = 24; n = 12 male; n = 12 female)
  2. a p value derived from post hoc Wald χ 2 (df = 1) tests of group differences for each condition
  3. bCohen’s d for transformed normal data
  4. cDifference in degrees Celsius between mild pain and moderate pain
  5. dDifference between verbal report of mild pain and moderate pain (0–20 unpleasantness scale)