Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 5 Psychosocial variables in knee OA

From: Neural and psychosocial contributions to sex differences in knee osteoarthritic pain

Study Findings
Dekker et al., 2009 [17] People with OA have a higher prevalence of depression and anxiety and this is associated with worse pain and greater healthcare utilization; sex differences not reported.
Fransen et al., 2002 [71] Systematic review showing exercise reduces pain and improves function in OA; sex differences not reported.
Lamb et al., 2008 [16] Behavioral interventions prior to surgery improve self-efficacy, decrease pain, and improve function in OA; sex differences not reported.
Lorig et al., 2008 [19] Self-management strategies improve self-efficacy and pain catastrophizing in OA; sex differences not reported.
Marks et al., 2009 [18] People with depression have reduced function and recover slower after total joint replacement; sex differences not reported.
Pells et al., 2008 [69] Higher self-efficacy scores in pain and function correlate with lower pain and greater function in OA; sex differences not reported.
Perrot et al., 2008 [66] Passive coping strategies generally result in higher pain and lower function; sex differences not reported.
Riddle et al., 2010 [68] Higher catastrophizing scores are associated with poor outcome 6 months after total knee replacement; sex differences not reported.
Shelby et al., 2008 [70] Self-efficacy beliefs underlie the relation between pain catastrophizing and pain; sex differences not reported.
Singh et al., 2008 [2] Pessimistic patients have more moderate-to-severe pain 2 years after total knee replacement; sex differences not reported.
Somers et al., 2009 [72] Pain-related fear explains part of the variance in physical disability, pain, and function in OA; sex differences not reported.
Sullivan et al., 2009 [14] Higher pain catastrophizing scores are associated with greater pain and disability 6 weeks after total joint replacement; sex differences not reported.
Tonelli et al., 2011 [15] Shows greater pain during movement in women with late stage OA; no difference in depression, anxiety or pain catastrophizing between sexes in OA; models predictors of movement pain in women and men with OA.
Tsai, 2007 [73] Depression tendency in OA explain a portion of the sex differences in pain.
Unruh, 1996 [67] Review discussing sex differences in the clinical pain experience.
  1. All studies were performed in human subjects and included both men and women.